Fast Five

SWC’s Fast Five

The much ignored generational cohort – X – is having its day and making bank while USPS is testing cashing it for them and everyone else. Want a high-paying job? STEM beats arts, but money isn’t everything, right? Maybe you English majors can get a leg up in the hiring game with a video, the latest thing. Also Windows 11, it ain’t Spinal Tap.

So, here’s this week’s Fast Five:

1 Gen X enjoys big rebound from 2008 financial crisis

Generation X has experienced a wealth boom – up 50 percent – in the U.S. since Covid-19 was declared a national emergency. During the pandemic, household wealth distribution has shifted from older generations to those who are reaching their peak earnings years.

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2 Job hunters get ready for your close up!

Here’s a how-to on adding video to your job hunt – a powerful way to introduce yourself to hiring managers. It provides a peek at your personality and showcases your soft skills, which more than 75 percent of hiring managers find difficult to assess from a standard resume.

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3 USPS paycheck cashing could transform how millions pay bills

The U.S. Postal Service quietly began offering paycheck-cashing services last month, testing a plan that financial experts say has the potential to transform how low-wage and underserved Americans access their money.

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4 Windows cranks it up to 11

Like an aging rock star seeking to reach a new audience, Microsoft is betting Windows 11 will help it connect with a new generation. Microsoft could once count on the computing market automatically choosing Windows because business demanded it. Windows still dominates the PC landscape, but the Mac has nearly doubled its share.

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5 Five most and least valuable college majors

STEM beats the arts in college majors, still. The top five: Architectural engineering, construction services, computer engineering, aerospace engineering or transportation sciences. Bringing up the rear: Anything having to do with the arts, composition and speech and clinical psychology.

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